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Prerequisites

Rebar
To build the project

Relevant Files

Project on Github

https://github.com/ChristopherBiscardi/Riak-Core-Consistent-Hash-Routing-Example

[chapp.erl](https://github.com/ChristopherBiscardi/Riak-Core-Consistent-Hash-Routing-Example/blob/master/a pps/chapp/src/chapp.erl)

Holds the different routing code

[chapp_vnode.erl](https://github.com/ChristopherBiscardi/Riak-Core-Consistent-Hash-Routing-Example/blob/master/apps/chapp/src /chapp_vnode.erl)

The ping function on the vnodes. This function is the same on every vnode, the difference is which vnode is processing the request.

The Code

erlang
%% @doc Pings a random vnode
ping() ->
DocIdx = riak_core_util:chash_key({>, term_to_binary(now())}),
PrefList = riak_core_apl:get_primary_apl(DocIdx, 1, chapp),
[{IndexNode, _Type}] = PrefList,
riak_core_vnode_master:sync_spawn_command(IndexNode, ping, chapp_vnode_master).

The first function, shown above, pings a random (random enough for our purposes) vnode and returns the partition identifier. The code we’re interested in is in the first line of the function – specifically the chash_key() function.

The chash_key function takes a two-tuple and returns a binary identifier we can use to get a PrefList. Much of the terminology in the Riak Core source refers to Riak KV. In this case, the variables are named Bucket and Key in the chash_key function.

Each function in [chapp.erl](https://github.com/ChristopherBiscardi/Riak-Core-Consistent-Hash-Routing-Example/blob/master/a pps/chapp/src/chapp.erl) has different tuples which affect which vnode gets called.

erlang
% ping()
{>, term_to_binary(now())}
% pingsame()
{>, >}
% pinginput(X)
{>, term_to_binary(X)}

so if we build the project.

bash
cd path/to/project
make rel

and run the console

bash
./rel/chapp/bin/chapp console

we can then execute the various ping() functions as such:

erlang
chapp:ping().

which gives us a tuple that contains pong and the partition id that processed the request.

We can see the results from running the ping() function a couple times below. Notice that each time we run ping(), a different partition handles the call.

erlang
{pong,1004782375664995756265033322492444576013453623296}
{pong,1050454301831586472458898473514828420377701515264}
{pong,1027618338748291114361965898003636498195577569280}
{pong,1118962191081472546749696200048404186924073353216}

Looking at the next function pingsame which we call as such:

erlang
chapp:pingsame().

we can see that by calling this function multiple times, we get the same partition handling the call, because the hash of the tuple is always the same.

erlang
{pong,936274486415109681974235595958868809467081785344}
{pong,936274486415109681974235595958868809467081785344}
{pong,936274486415109681974235595958868809467081785344}
{pong,936274486415109681974235595958868809467081785344}

The pinginput function allows us to take a more interactive look at where our requests go. pinginput uses the input we give it as the second element in the chash_key function tuple.

erlang
chapp:pinginput(someinput).

we can see that by calling this function multiple times with the same input, the same vnode processes the request.

erlang
chapp:pinginput(someinput).
{pong,959110449498405040071168171470060731649205731328}
chapp:pinginput(someinput).
{pong,959110449498405040071168171470060731649205731328}
chapp:pinginput(someinput).
{pong,959110449498405040071168171470060731649205731328}

We can also see that by calling pinginput with a different input results in a different vnode handling the request.

erlang
chapp:pinginput(otherinput).
{pong,342539446249430371453988632667878832731859189760}
chapp:pinginput(otherinput).
{pong,342539446249430371453988632667878832731859189760}
chapp:pinginput(otherinput).
{pong,342539446249430371453988632667878832731859189760}